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Eli at the Eau Gallie Science Center, February 2004



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Cathy sent her voice over to me the other morning using technology to make a ringing noise in my room.  I was still asleep, but I was out of bed and cadillac'ing my way to Cocoa 3 minutes later.

Eli, Cathy and Jessy's first kid, was floating around in a bubble of explorataculappiness the whole time we were there.  We helped him build a pvc fort, which only could have been better if dad could have been there to manage us.

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The museum lady, you know the old lady reading a book at a rarely visited museum that seems surprised to see anyone, donated some pennies to us so that we could donate some pennies to the gravity vortex.

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I am totally lost trying to understand how this demonstration works.  They have some pvc pipes painted silver and some other colors, but there's no metal.  The pipes are different lengths and are straight except an elbow at one end where you're supposed to put your ear and listen to the "sounds of the sun."  It's just supposed to work on resonance and the longer the pipe the lower the pitch of the hum you hear when you put your ear to it.  But last time I listened to a pvc pipe, I didn't hear any humming.  So what kind of voodoo magic is this?


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Next to the Solar Corner was the Gravity Racer.  The gravity racer let you race tennis balls down a hilly path vs. down a straight path (the hilly path wins, I don't get this one either, the science museum makes me feel stupid!).  When Eli wasn't taking tennis balls from the gravity racer and sticking them in the pipes at the solar corner, he was running around the science museum like a crazed lunatic, or like an interested one and a half year old, depending on your perspective. 

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A lot was learned that day and all before nap time. How about some explanations of how the exhibits work? Next time we hope there is a big boat building strike so that Jessy can come with us.

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